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Junior/Senior Requirements

IB logoIB 101 #1
The International Baccalaureate Program is divided into six academic groups, plus three additional core requirements including; a course called Theory of Knowledge (TOK), a 4,000-word Extended Essay (EE), and volunteering in three areas; Creative, Action and Service (CAS).

Group 1: Language A (The following curriculum information is available on the IB Online Curriculum Center)
The course is built on the assumption that literature is concerned with our conceptions, interpretations and experiences of the world. The study of literature can therefore be an exploration of the way it represents the complex pursuits, anxieties, joys and fears to which human beings are exposed in the daily business of living. It enables an exploration of one of the more enduring fields of human creativity, and provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking. It also promotes respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the understanding and interpretation of literary works.

Through the study of a wide range of literature, the language A: literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the language A: literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language.

Language A: literature is divided into four parts, each with a particular focus.
Fort Myers IB Group 1: Language A

  • Part 1: Works in translation (Chronicle of a Death Foretold, by Garcia Marquez, A Doll’s House, by Ibsen, The Stranger, by Camus)
  • Part 2: Detailed study (17th Century Poetry, Donne, Hamlet, by Shakespeare, In Cold Blood, By Capote)
  • Part 3: Literary genres (In the Lake of the Woods, by, O’Brien, Penelopiad, Atwood, The Signet Classic Book of Mark Twain’s Short Stories, by Twain, Wuthering Heights, by Bronte
  • Part 4: Options (The Sun Also Rises, by Hemmingway, A Long Way Gone, by Beah, The Sound and the Fury, by Faulkner)

IB 101 #2
Group 2: Language B
Language B- Spanish SL and HL
Prescribed themes Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B and language
ab initio; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP,
and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global
interest. The five prescribed themes are:
• identities
• experiences
• human ingenuity
• social organization
• sharing the planet.
The themes allow students to compare the target language and
culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide
opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP.
SL Assessments
Paper 1- Writing Task on productive skills 25%
Paper 2- Receptive Skills on Reading and Listening Comprehension 50%
Internal Assessment- Conversation based on visual stimulus followed by discussion based on additional
theme 25%
HL Assessments
Paper 1- Writing Task on productive skills 25%
Paper 2- Receptive Skills Reading and Listening Comprehension 50%
Internal Assessment- A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary
works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus.
25%

IB 101 #3
Group 3: Individuals and Societies (The following curriculum information is available on the IB Online Curriculum Center)
Individuals and Societies. More commonly, these subjects are collectively known as the human sciences or social sciences. Group 3 subjects explore the interactions between humans and their environment in time, space and place.

History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of recording, reconstructing and interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present.

Students of history should learn how the discipline works. It is an exploratory subject that poses questions without providing definitive answers. In order to understand the past, students must engage with it both through exposure to primary historical sources and through the work of historians. Historical study involves both selection and interpretation of data and critical evaluation of it. Students of history should appreciate the relative nature of historical knowledge and understanding, as each generation reflects its own world and preoccupations and as more evidence emerges. A study of history both requires and develops an individual’s understanding of, and empathy for, people living in other periods and contexts.

History HL core syllabus comprising an in-depth study of an individual prescribed subject and the selection of two topics. FMHS IB students study route 2 that encompasses the main developments in 20th century world history.

Thus, Diploma Programme history provides both structure and flexibility, fostering an understanding of major historical events in a global context. It requires students to make comparisons between similar and dissimilar solutions to common human situations, whether they be political, economic or social. It invites comparisons between, but not judgments of, different cultures, political systems and national traditions.

The content of the history course is intrinsically interesting, and it is hoped that many students who follow it will become fascinated with the discipline, developing a lasting interest in it, whether or not they continue to study it formally.

The international perspective in Diploma Programme history provides a sound platform for the promotion of international understanding and, inherently, the intercultural awareness necessary to prepare students for global citizenship. Above all, it helps to foster respect and understanding of people and events in a variety of cultures throughout the world.

Global Politics SL
Core units: people power, and politics focusing on four compulsory units:
1. Power, Sovereignty, and International Relations
2. Human Rights
3. Development
4. Peace and Conflict
Assessments
Paper 1- Stimulus-based paper based on a topic from one of the four core units 30%
Paper 2- Two essays from a choice of eight, each selected

Psychology HL and SL is the systematic study of behavior and mental processes. Psychology has its roots in both the natural and social sciences, leading to a variety of research designs and applications, and providing a unique approach to understanding modern society. IB psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IB psychology. Psychology and the international dimension Psychology are the systematic study of behavior and mental processes. Psychology has its roots in both the natural and social sciences, leading to a variety of research designs and applications, and providing a unique approach to understanding modern society.

IB psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IB psychology.

Economics SL is a dynamic social science, forming part of group 3, The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements.

The IB Diploma Programme economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum—rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.

The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate throughout the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on human end-goals and values. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world.

IB 101 #4 Group 4: Experimental Sciences
A common curriculum model applies to all the Diploma Programme group 4 subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Systems & Societies. There are some differences in this model for design technology and these arise from the design project, which is a unique feature of this subject. Students at both SL and HL study a core syllabus, and this is supplemented by the study of options. Students at HL also study additional higher-level material. Students at both SL and HL study two options. Students at SL are required to spend 40 hours, and students at HL 60 hours, on practical/investigative work. This includes 10 hours for the group 4 project.

Biology is the study of life. The first organisms appeared on the planet over 3 billion years ago and, through reproduction and natural selection, have given rise to the 8 million or so different species alive today. Estimates vary, but over the course of evolution 4 billion species could have been produced. Most of these flourished for a period and then became extinct as new, better adapted species took their place. There have been at least five periods when very large numbers of species became extinct and biologists are concerned that another mass extinction is under way, caused this time by human activity. Nonetheless, there are more species alive on Earth today than ever before. This diversity makes biology both an endless source of fascination and a considerable challenge.

An interest in life is natural for humans; not only are we living organisms ourselves, but we depend on many species for our survival, are threatened by some and co-exist with many more. From the earliest cave paintings to the modern wildlife documentary, this interest is as obvious as it is ubiquitous, as biology continues to fascinate young and old all over the world.

Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It is often called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment.

Environmental Systems and Societies The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Students’ attention can be constantly drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues. The teaching therefore includes the students evaluating the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of environmental issues.

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